Halstead: Caller's £19 bill for six minute call

Halstead Gazette: Roselyn Bocking clocked up a big phone bill for a short call Roselyn Bocking clocked up a big phone bill for a short call

A grandmother got a shock after clocking up a £19 bill for a phone call that lasted less than seven minutes.

Roselyn Bocking used directory enquiries service 118 118 to call the Halstead Gazette about problems with lack of gritting in her street, Mitchell Avenue, in Halstead.

However, she did not realise it would cost £3 a minute for the six minute 31 seconds call on her Tesco mobile phone network.

She said: “They quoted me the price from a landline but I am sure they didn’t quote me the price from a mobile.”

Calls to 118 118 cost 38p per call plus £1.59 per minute for BT landlines but calls vary for mobile phones.

Tesco Mobile charges £3 a minute for directory enquiries other than its own.

Comments (2)

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5:20pm Tue 22 Jan 13

OMPITA [UK] says...

In the on line version of the Braintree & Witham Times there is a sad report on an elderly gentleman being tricked into parting with his money by people in whom he placed his trust - see ‘Conmen Pose as Cops in Distraction Burglary’.

I must confess that I am having some difficulty in viewing Tesco in any significantly different light. I am of the firm opinion that this lady was also tricked into parting with her money by people in whom she also placed her trust.

The only difference being in that they were far more remote and cunning. I.e. the avaricious faceless creeps who craft the contractual small print that eventually snares unsuspecting victims who let their guard down for just a moment.

Commercial entrepreneurs? I don’t think so. More like anonymous heartless hyenas with an insatiable **** for more and more profit with no justification and certainly no thought whatsoever for the impact on the ‘victim’.

What a horrible business!
In the on line version of the Braintree & Witham Times there is a sad report on an elderly gentleman being tricked into parting with his money by people in whom he placed his trust - see ‘Conmen Pose as Cops in Distraction Burglary’. I must confess that I am having some difficulty in viewing Tesco in any significantly different light. I am of the firm opinion that this lady was also tricked into parting with her money by people in whom she also placed her trust. The only difference being in that they were far more remote and cunning. I.e. the avaricious faceless creeps who craft the contractual small print that eventually snares unsuspecting victims who let their guard down for just a moment. Commercial entrepreneurs? I don’t think so. More like anonymous heartless hyenas with an insatiable **** for more and more profit with no justification and certainly no thought whatsoever for the impact on the ‘victim’. What a horrible business! OMPITA [UK]
  • Score: 0

5:44pm Tue 22 Jan 13

OMPITA [UK] says...

I see that I have fallen foul of the ‘Four Letter Word Police’ in my above submission.

I protest my innocence and would not wish anyone to think that I proffered any profanities for publication.

For anyone who is wondering what the word was, here are the clues.

It begins with L and rhymes with crust.

I’ve no doubt that it probably gets some fairly significant usage in the likes of Lady Chatterley’s Lover etc. but I seek to assure any delicate lady readers about to have an attack of the vapours that my usage of it was in an entirely different context!
I see that I have fallen foul of the ‘Four Letter Word Police’ in my above submission. I protest my innocence and would not wish anyone to think that I proffered any profanities for publication. For anyone who is wondering what the word was, here are the clues. It begins with L and rhymes with crust. I’ve no doubt that it probably gets some fairly significant usage in the likes of Lady Chatterley’s Lover etc. but I seek to assure any delicate lady readers about to have an attack of the vapours that my usage of it was in an entirely different context! OMPITA [UK]
  • Score: 0

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