Mum raises concerns over "danger" crossing in Braintree

Halstead Gazette: Mum raises concerns over "danger" crossing in Braintree Mum raises concerns over "danger" crossing in Braintree

A Braintree mum is calling for increased safety measures at a “nightmare” crossing.

Kay Barkaway, 43, regularly uses the crossing in Courtauld Road but says she and her son Leigh take their lives in their hands.

She said: “There were three cars coming from the Railway Street direction and I was waiting there with my son, but they didn’t bother to stop."

An Essex Highways spokesman said: “Essex County Council takes road safety very seriously and monitors the number of collisions which occur in order to identify where it may be necessary to introduce road safety measures.

“The collisions at the junction of Julien Court Road have been analysed and currently this junction does not meet the criteria for any casualty reduction measures. We are not aware of any queries that have been received in relation to this crossing."

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1:09pm Sun 23 Mar 14

OMPITA [Intl] says...

I do so respect Mrs Barkaway’s concerns. She clearly has genuine concerns for the safety of children using the crossing. However…….

The subject unlocks some very vivid memories for me, when probably about the same age as her son I recall that we were routinely visited in school by PC Peters (Braintree’s Road Safety Police Officer) to be inculcated with an understanding of the subject matter. Notwithstanding some uncomfortable wriggling to begin with by those of us with some recent guilty recall of the odd bit of scrumping or trespassing we were soon totally captivated by his persona as got onto the subject of Road Safety. Indeed we all revered the man and always looked forward to his next visit. Policemen were 'our friends' in those days.

Along with Dial Telephones, Blue Flashing Lights and Sirens, Pedestrian Crossings were just far off aspirations of the brave new world that were at that time yet to come to the Braintree of the future.

Nevertheless, to this day I have never forgotten for a moment what he drummed into us on the subject of crossing the road at ‘Belisha Beacons’, as pedestrian crossings were then called.

That was to always stop at the kerb, wait until you had eye contact with any approaching driver; and cross only when it was clear that the driver had seen you and was undoubtedly stopping to let you cross. Time and time again he reiterated that ‘Belisha Beacons’, ‘ Pedestrian Crossings’ – call them what you will – WERE NOT MAGIC CARPETS! - and would not protect you if you didn’t take appropriate care.

How I wish that the legions of Kamikaze Pedestrians it is my misfortune to constantly encounter up here in Planet Zog could somehow acquire that mind-set. Sadly, it is a daily occurrence for me to be faced with idiots (hearing impeded by headphones, side vision shielded by hoods) who without even glancing towards the driver step into the path of oncoming vehicles necessitating emergency avoiding action. As often as not, with their backs to the driver, they even step out diagonally when they are still a few yards away from the crossing. Their only protection sometimes being the (sacrificial?) baby buggy that they push in front of them!

With regard to drivers, only days ago whilst giving way to someone at a crossing the moron behind simply overtook me, narrowly missing the pedestrian who had begun to cross.

Just where has it all gone wrong?
I do so respect Mrs Barkaway’s concerns. She clearly has genuine concerns for the safety of children using the crossing. However……. The subject unlocks some very vivid memories for me, when probably about the same age as her son I recall that we were routinely visited in school by PC Peters (Braintree’s Road Safety Police Officer) to be inculcated with an understanding of the subject matter. Notwithstanding some uncomfortable wriggling to begin with by those of us with some recent guilty recall of the odd bit of scrumping or trespassing we were soon totally captivated by his persona as got onto the subject of Road Safety. Indeed we all revered the man and always looked forward to his next visit. Policemen were 'our friends' in those days. Along with Dial Telephones, Blue Flashing Lights and Sirens, Pedestrian Crossings were just far off aspirations of the brave new world that were at that time yet to come to the Braintree of the future. Nevertheless, to this day I have never forgotten for a moment what he drummed into us on the subject of crossing the road at ‘Belisha Beacons’, as pedestrian crossings were then called. That was to always stop at the kerb, wait until you had eye contact with any approaching driver; and cross only when it was clear that the driver had seen you and was undoubtedly stopping to let you cross. Time and time again he reiterated that ‘Belisha Beacons’, ‘ Pedestrian Crossings’ – call them what you will – WERE NOT MAGIC CARPETS! - and would not protect you if you didn’t take appropriate care. How I wish that the legions of Kamikaze Pedestrians it is my misfortune to constantly encounter up here in Planet Zog could somehow acquire that mind-set. Sadly, it is a daily occurrence for me to be faced with idiots (hearing impeded by headphones, side vision shielded by hoods) who without even glancing towards the driver step into the path of oncoming vehicles necessitating emergency avoiding action. As often as not, with their backs to the driver, they even step out diagonally when they are still a few yards away from the crossing. Their only protection sometimes being the (sacrificial?) baby buggy that they push in front of them! With regard to drivers, only days ago whilst giving way to someone at a crossing the moron behind simply overtook me, narrowly missing the pedestrian who had begun to cross. Just where has it all gone wrong? OMPITA [Intl]
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