More than 1,000 Braintree households suffer power cut after cable fault

Halstead Gazette: More than 1,000 Braintree households suffer power cut after cable fault More than 1,000 Braintree households suffer power cut after cable fault

More than 1,000 Braintree homes were without power after a fault on a high-voltage underground cable.

Power was interrupted to 1,088 properties at about 11pm yesterday in the Hay Lane and Chapel Hill area.

UK Power Networks engineers restored supplies to 879 customers by about 1am today

The remaining customers had their supplies returned to normal by about 3.30am.

A UK Power Networks spokesman said: “We realise how difficult it can be to be without power and apologise for any inconvenience."

Comments (3)

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9:12pm Mon 17 Feb 14

Ernied says...

Haha. That is by far the best library picture ever! ! Shame to those who lost power though.
Haha. That is by far the best library picture ever! ! Shame to those who lost power though. Ernied
  • Score: 1

9:56am Tue 18 Feb 14

OMPITA [Intl] says...

Ernied wrote:
Haha. That is by far the best library picture ever! ! Shame to those who lost power though.
And a mighty strange specimen to boot!

Moulded plug with no replaceable fuse???

I hope nobody is using any of those in their homes!
[quote][p][bold]Ernied[/bold] wrote: Haha. That is by far the best library picture ever! ! Shame to those who lost power though.[/p][/quote]And a mighty strange specimen to boot! Moulded plug with no replaceable fuse??? I hope nobody is using any of those in their homes! OMPITA [Intl]
  • Score: 1

3:01pm Fri 21 Feb 14

/@|_|@\ says...

Ha. A molded plug that is attached to the appliance and an electrical system that is properly wired with appropriate GPI circuit breakers and main breakers at the junction box obviating the need to have a fuse at the appliance. That's the idea! I have been using a (two-prong) molded plug with no fuse for three decades and never understood the old fashioned and, I suggest, dangerous method employed by the UK (and others). The need for a third prong in all cases is at best dubious and pretty-much rendered redundant. To open the slots for the hot and neutral? Really? I would also ask the reason and efficacy for of 220 V (rather than the 110/120 used in a lot of other countries), given the potential ("potential" -- get it? LOL) for serious shock?
Ha. A molded plug that is attached to the appliance and an electrical system that is properly wired with appropriate GPI circuit breakers and main breakers at the junction box obviating the need to have a fuse at the appliance. That's the idea! I have been using a (two-prong) molded plug with no fuse for three decades and never understood the old fashioned and, I suggest, dangerous method employed by the UK (and others). The need for a third prong in all cases is at best dubious and pretty-much rendered redundant. To open the slots for the hot and neutral? Really? I would also ask the reason and efficacy for of 220 V (rather than the 110/120 used in a lot of other countries), given the potential ("potential" -- get it? LOL) for serious shock? /@|_|@\
  • Score: 0

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